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Natural Awakenings Coastal Carolinas

Avoid Infant Formulas with Added Sugar

Baby bottle of infant formula next to sugar cubes and small white rocking horse

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Early exposures to certain foods shape preferences that endure through adulthood, studies show, which is why research from the University of Kansas Medical Center and the University of Buffalo has raised concerns about the added sugar prominent in many baby formulas, especially cows’ milk formulas. The researchers tested 97 infants and 44 toddlers that were either breastfed or given various formulas for up to 15 months. The infants given formulas with added sugar had significant weight gain compared to infants that were breastfed or given formulas without added sugar. The sugar in formulas was found to be almost double the amount of sugar in breast milk. The researchers theorized that the added sugar not only raised the risk of weight gain, but also made it likely the children drank a greater amount. “Efforts by policymakers and pediatricians to educate mothers on lower-sugar options when breastfeeding is not feasible may enhance preventive measures of childhood obesity,” write the authors.